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Archivistische beschrijving
Russia
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Marcia Pitch

Oral Interview with Marcia Pitch for the JMABC Artists Scribe. Interviewed by Carol Herbert. Marcia discusses her upbringing in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and her parents and grandparents’ origins in Eastern Europe and immigration to Canada. Marcia mentions influences that led her to the arts, including education at the University of Manitoba and doing graduate work in California. In 1969, Marcia experienced the police suppression in response to the People’s Park Revolution in Berkeley. Soon after she returned to Vancouver where she studied education at UBC and volunteered with Amnesty International. She pursued an art style that reflected her strong feelings about politics, war, and the influences of her grandparents’ stories of Eastern European pogroms. Marcia's art includes mixed media collages and sculptures, and producing large scale installations for her gallery exhibitions. Marcia speaks about her upcoming project focusing on sexuality, women’s repression and feminism. She further explains her perspective as an older woman in the art world and the differing responses she has received regarding her art online vs. in person. Marcia relates experiences such as having children, volunteering, and being a part of the recycling community to how they’ve inspired her pieces or participation in the arts community.

Bernard Victor

Oral interview with Bernard Victor who was born in Gomel, Russia in 1893 and came to Vancouver, on April 15, 1923, from Winnipeg. Bernard was involved with Talmud Torah, B'nai B'rith, and the Jewish Literary Club. He describes living through two pogroms in Russia. He served in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces in Europe from 1916 until 1919. His father worked for the Russian Vital Statistics Department and noticed large numbers of Jews leaving, encouraged Bernard and Bernard's brother to leave.

Max and Susie Dodek

Oral history interview with Max and Susie Dodek. Max was born 1900 in Winipeg and Susie was born 1910 in Winnipeg.

Max Poplack

Oral history interview with Max Poplack who was born in Vilna, Russia in 1898. The family emigrated to the United States between 1909 to 1910, landing on the East Coast than moving further west and settling in Washington. Max speaks of his father's involvement in the meat industry in Russia and Washington and his own involvement as a butcher in Vancouver.

Harry Smith

Oral history interview with Harry Smith who was born in Russia in 1896. When the family emigrated to Canada in 1905, their family name was changed to Shumacher. Harry with his family (married in 1918) to Vancouver in 1932 for the education of his daughter. Was involved with Friends of Hebrew University.

Miriam Karp

Oral Interview with Miriam Karp. Interviewed by Alisa Lazear for Feeding Community podcast.

David Kaplan

Oral interview with David Kaplan. Interviewed by Bill Gruenthal. David talks about his family's involvement with the steel industry and the Jewish Botanical Gardens. Eventually settling in Vancouver, David opened a very successful R&D tax consultation firm and later on became heavily involved with the Jewish Family Services Agency. He also discusses Jewish education in South Africa.

Vanessa Marks

Interview with Vanessa Marks. Interviewed by Cindy Rozen. Vanessa talks about her family's history, her childhood, and her immigration to New Zealand and eventually Canada. She compares life, culture, and the Jewish community between South Africa and Canada, and talks briefly about her education, career, and family.

Carole Malkin

Interview with Carole Malkin. Interviewed by Jane Cherry for The Scribe, 2018. Carole talks about her family's history and their restaurants in Vancouver, including Skipper Seafoods, The Fish and Oyster Bar, and The Dollhouse. Carole talks about her childhood and involvement in the Jewish community, including United Synagogue Youth, Young Judea, and Camp Hatikvah.

Logina Dimant

Interview with Longina Dimant. Longina, born as Hinda Wejgman, grew up in Warsaw, Poland. She talks about her life and her family in Poland before the Second World War, which she describes as happy. They lived in Pelcowizna, a neighbourhood in Poland, until the war. In late 1939, Longina and her family fled Poland by train to Siberia. They stopped in Małkinia for a few days before continuing on to Leninogorsk (now Ridder, Kazakhstan) where they lived for the next six and a half years. At 14, Longina began working at a brick factory. It was a difficult life and they were always hungry. After the war, Longina went to Moscow to try and speak to politician Kalinin to ask him if her family should go back to Poland or stay in Russia; he told her to go back to Poland.

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