Showing 211 results

Authority record

Seidelman (family)

  • Family
  • 1854-

William Seidelman, who was born in Budapest in 1854, came to North America around 1879, eventually arriving in Vancouver by way of Kansas and Seattle. In 1879 he served as a postmaster in the town of Guelph, Kansas. After settling in Vancouver, William married Esther Pearlman [Dalkin] from Winnipeg on August 30th, 1896. In that same year, William opened a general merchandise store in Cedar Cove on the South side of Powell Street at Victoria Drive. In 1900, a post office was opened in the store and Seidelman became Cedar Cove's first postmaster. The Seidelman home was located at 1735 2nd Avenue, East Grandview (the house is still standing today). William and Esther maintained Kashrut and he slaughtered chickens in accordance with the laws of Shechita using a traditional Chalif which is in the possession of the JMABC. Their children were: Edward Joseph [Joe] who was born in 1897; Rachel, [Rae] who was born in 1898; Harry who was born in 1900; and Benjamin [Ben] who was born in 1902. William Jr. [Bill] was born after the father died in 1907. Their mother, Esther, passed away in 1937. William Sr. is buried in the Bikur Cholim Cemetery in Seattle. Esther is buried in the Schara Tzedeck Cemetery in New Westminster.

Joseph, Rachel and Harry attended Macdonald Elementary School. Rachel also attended Seymour and Grandview public schools. All three attended Britannia High School. Joseph went to the University of British Columbia (then a branch of McGill University). At UBC, Joseph joined the Western University Battalion which fought in France in World War I. He saw service along with fellow UBC students. Joseph was killed in the Battle of Passchendaele on October 26, 1917, the first member of Vancouver's Jewish community to give his life for his country. Joseph's name is included on a plaque in the War Memorial Gym at UBC that commemorates those UBC students who fought and gave their lives in World War I.

Harry, at age 17 (1917), joined the Canadian Pacific Ocean Services as a cadet. He sailed the Pacific Ocean on the Empress of Japan and on the RMS Niagara before returning to Vancouver. He subsequently served on the Union Steamship Line that sailed between Vancouver and Alaska. After working for Buckerfields Feed Company, Harry joined the United Milling and Grain Co. Ltd. as a partner. He remained with the United Milling & Grain until 1961 when the company went out of business due to the City of Vancouver expropriating the land for housing.

Harry married Esther Blank of Winnipeg in 1938. Harry and Esther lived in Vancouver and were strong supporters of the Jewish Community Centre and charter members of the Beth Israel Synagogue. Harry died in 1972 and is buried in the Beth Israel Cemetery. Harry's children are Perry Seidelman, the first Jewish vice principal of a high school for the Vancouver School Board and the first Principal of King David High School. Perry lives in Vancouver.

Dr. William (Bill) Seidelman is a retired physician, formerly of the Universities of McMaster and Toronto medical faculties. At the beginning of his career, Bill was the first full-time family physician to practice at the Reach Clinic, one of the earliest walk-in medical clinics in Vancouver. He continues to be a world renowned authority and lecturer on medical ethics as a consequence of his research into the legacy of medicine during the Third Reich. He now resides in Israel with his family.

After high-school, Rachel attended UBC and Normal School and taught for a few years at Strathcona Public School. In 1919 Rachel became involved with the Jewish community and volunteered with Hebrew Aid, B'nai B'rith, the National Council of Jewish Women, and joined the effort to start a Reform Synagogue. Rachel taught English to landed immigrants at night school, played tennis and basketball and later took up golf. Rachel met Dr. William [Bill] Morris at the home of Ruth Mahrer, Rachel's best friend. Rachel and Bill were married in 1925 and lived in Vancouver. Rachel died in 1985 and is buried in the Beth Israel Cemetery. Rachel Morris's [nee Seidelman] daughters are Judy Zaitzow, Dorothy Grad, and Lillian Fryfield, all of whom live in Vancouver.

Ben married Sarah Weis of Winnipeg. Ben and Sarah did not have children and lived at various places throughout B.C. including Port Mellon on the Sunshine Coast and Crofton on Vancouver Island. They eventually moved to Los Angeles to be near Sarah's family. Ben died in 1983.

Bill married Hazel. They lived in Vancouver their entire married life and had one child, Roy, who is living in Summerland B.C. Bill died in 1983, the same year as his brother Ben.

Murray Goldman

  • Family
  • August 24, 1920 - June 10, 2013

Murray Goldman was born in Opatow, Poland August 24, 1920 and moved to Montreal when he was three years old. By 13, Murray had quit school to contribute to family income and by 16 he was a shy salesman with the Fuller Brush Company. Soon Murray was attracted to fashion - and began his fashion career by sweeping floors and selling shirts and ties at Cortly's Menswear. At 21, Murray was recruited into the army stationed in Comox, BC where he became a member of the Canadian Army Boxing Team. On leaving the army, Murray moved to Vancouver, got a job at the Hudson Bay Company and in 1944 he married local girl, Shirley Lapides. Murray and Shirley had two children: David and Penny.

Murray Goldman turned the store that carried his name into the store that carried his personality and in doing so he discovered that the best way to sell suits was to sell himself. Murray then embarked on a marketing campaign that is today the stuff of local legend by writing, narrating, voicing, appearing and directing his own print, radio and TV commercials. He was a 1-man marketing show - with a very funny brand of totally off-the-wall humor. Through his flamboyant marketing and gimmicks Murray opened more stores with a young men's department called The Ivy Room. Murray became sought-after personality and MC of many fund raising 'roasts'. He wrote a famous daily "tidbits" column in the now defunct Vancouver News Herald, and ended them with the mysterious words...."good evening Mrs. Johnson". In time, Murray had a half hour Sunday morning comedy show on CKNW. He was so well liked that in 1964 he was voted Vancouver's most popular radio personality, on the strength of his commercials alone!

Behind the scenes, Murray was committed to his family and his Orthodox Jewish faith. He was president of the Schara Tzedeck Synagogue Men's Club, a founding member of today's Jewish Community Centre, a fifty-year member of B'nai B'rith, and a long time board member of the Louis Briar Home for Jewish seniors. Dedicated to community service, Murray was and a member of Variety Club International for over fifty years and while awards were not his motivation, he accumulated a list of awards that go on longer than his tape measure:
1971 - Businessman of the Year - Vancouver Junior Chamber of Commerce
1972 - Man of the Year by Big Brothers
1974 - Man of the Year by Canadian Council of Christians and Jews
1982 - Big Brothers created the 'Murray Goldman Award' given annually to the person or organization showing exemplary support towards Big Brothers.
1986 - Vancouver Centennial Award by the Governor-General of Canada
1988 - Presidents Advisory Board of the Big Brothers of Greater Vancouver
1989 - Honorary Chairman, Big Brothers of Greater Vancouver
1990 - National Presidents Award; Big Brothers of Canada
2000 - Order of British Columbia
2003 - Medal for the Golden Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

Langer family

  • Family
  • 1874 -

Fritz and Olga Langer fled Vienna with their son Michael Hans Max Langer (later Livni) and their daughter Lucy (later Laufer) at the outbreak of World War II, when Lucy was only 7 months old. The family escaped to France, where they waited in the suburbs of Paris for approximately 8 months until they were allowed into Palestine in February of 1939. Times were tumultuous in Palestine, and Fritz struggled to find work. In 1942, the Langers left Palestine for Canada, where Fritz’s previous employers in Austria had emigrated. The influence and financial support of the Bloch-Bauer (later Bentley) and Pick (later Prentice) families made it possible for the Langers to be included in the 112 Jews who were admitted to Canada by Order in Council in that year. The first stop was Trinidad, where they waited to receive visas to travel through the United States. After getting their visas, the family boarded a ship called the Robert E. Lee. One day out from port, the Robert E. Lee was torpedoed and sunk within minutes. The family’s important documents, money, and Olga’s jewelry was lost, but the family survived on a lifeboat. They were eventually rescued and taken to port in New Orleans. The Langers were able to see their family in St. Louis, Missouri and New York, New York before they finally arrived in Vancouver, four years after they first left their home in Austria.

Olga Langer (born Spitzer) was born in 1900 in Vienna. She grew up in a moderately upper-class household and completed grade 12, including some Jewish education. Following her education, Olga worked as a bookkeeper for her father. She married Fritz Langer in 1924, in Vienna. The couple enjoyed travel and recreation together in their youth. The transition from her life of relative ease in Europe to the struggles of life in Canada was difficult for Olga, but she proved herself a devoted mother and incredibly supportive wife. Olga worked full-time in her husband’s store and ran the household, a life member of Hadassah who was too busy to ever attend a single meeting. She died in Vancouver in 1982. Olga’s parents were Alfred and Else (born Selinko) Spitzer.

Friedrich (Fritz) Langer (born Lowy) was born in 1891 in Vienna. Fritz was an officer in the First World War in the Mounted Artillery of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Fritz was an insightful and practical man; He changed his last name from Lowy to Langer in 1918 to avoid discrimination. Fritz received a law degree from the University of Vienna and worked managing cotton mills for the Picks and Bloch-Bauers, eventually helping his employers get out of Austria following the Nazi invasion on the 12th of March in 1938. In Canada, Fritz first worked for Pacific Veneer and Plywood in New Westminster, and in 1944 opened The New Stamp Shop on Hornby (later West Pender), which he ran until a few years before he died in 1976 at the age of 84. Fritz’s parents were Morris and Helene Lowy.

Olga’s mother Elsa was born to Rosalie Kaufman and Franz Salinko in 1875. She worked as a private English teacher and maintained the home. Elsa died of cancer in 1929. Alfred was born to Morris and Yohanna (born Goldstein) Spitzer in 1870 and died in 1959. Alfred was a bank director and bookkeeper, and moved to St. Louis, MO in the United States as a refugee in 1939. Alfred re-married following Elsa’s death, to Ella Than. Alfred and Elsa had three daughters: Olga (born 1900), Elizabeth (Liese, born 1901), and Margaret (Grete, born 1902, married Arthur Golz).

Fritz’s father Morris Lowy was born in 1855 in Bratislava to Adolf Lowy and [Jetty Schwarz], and moved to Vienna with his family at a very young age in the late 1850s. As an adult he owned a company that manufactured children’s clothing. Morris died in 1927. Helene was born to Heinrich and Caroline (born Mayer) Lemberger in Vienna in 1862 and died of cancer in 1915. Morris and Helene had two children: Fritz and Marianne (Mimi, married name Geyerahn).

Results 51 to 60 of 211