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Davis, Hal

  • A.2019.011
  • Pessoa
  • 1924 - November 1, 1998

Hal (Harold Leon) Davis was born on January 16th, 1924 in Edmonton Alberta to parents Osias and Jenny Davis. He had an older brother, Frank, who was born 10 years earlier, and an older sister, Lily. In 1945, Hal married Esther Kuchuk and in 1948 had their daughter Andrea, and in 1953 their son Jeff followed.

In 1941, CJCA Edmonton staged an "Announcing Contest". The winner was Hal Davis. The prize - two weeks employment with CJCA. It was the start of a long and impressive career in radio broadcasting
While attending the University of Alberta from 1941 to 1943, Hal did part-time work at the university's radio station - CKUA, and worked the summer of '42 at CJCA.
Serving in the RCAF from 1943-45, and while stationed in Calgary, there was some part-time work at CFAC. On discharge, Hal did a stint as a disc jockey at New Westminster's CKNW, leaving there in September to enrol in Lorne Greene's Academy of Radio Arts in Toronto, from which he graduated cum laude in April of 1947.
The same year, Hal began his long association with CKNW - first, as Copy Chief; 1950 - Production Manager; 1956 - Program Director; 1959 - Assistant Manager/Program Director; 1974 General Manager.
In 1978, Hal was appointed Director of Research - Radio for CKNW's parent - Western Broadcasting Company Limited (later, Western International Communications (WIC)). Retiring in 1989, Hal continued at CKNW as a consultant and broadcaster.
Hal set a remarkable record in radio annals when, in 1991, he chalked-up 35 years as the voice of CKNW's 8 am news. Also, he hosted a Saturday night music program on 'NW. for a span of 20 years.
In the news area, Hal conceived, organized and developed B.C. RADIO NEWS, (later WESTERN INFORMATION NETWORK (WIN)), directed it until 1988, and making it the first private information network in Canada to be transmitted by satellite.
On the local scene, Hal was an Administrator of the CKNW ORPHANS' FUND, and a member and chair (1972-89) of BROADCAST COMMUNICATION ADVISORY COUNCIL at the British Columbia Institute of Technology.
Active in the affairs of the broadcasting industry, Hal was a director of the British Columbia Broadcasters Association (80-85), and president from 82-84. He served as a director of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters from 83-84.
In 1985, he was named BCAB Broadcaster of the Year in recognition of his development of the WIN network.
In 1996, Hal Davis was inducted into the CAB Broadcast Hall of Fame.
He died on November 1st, 1998.

Source:
Potts, J. Lyman. “Davis Harold L. ‘Hal.’” History of Canadian Broadcasting. Accessed November 6, 2019. https://www.broadcasting-history.ca/personalities/davis-harold-l-hal.

Staniloff, Sid

  • A.2020.001
  • Pessoa
  • 1920 - 1995

Sid Staniloff was born circa 1924 in Winnipeg, Manitoba to Max and Sophie Staniloff. It is unknown how he settled in Vancouver. Sid served as an officer in the Royal Air Force and completed a tour of duty in the Far East Theatre. He became a manager of a menswear shop, in Lansdowne Centre, Richmond (unknown years and store name). Sid and his wife Ethel had two children, Howard and Mindi Staniloff. Sid was a loyal member of B’nai B’rith and during the 1970s (circa 1972 – 1974), became president of the Lions Gate Lodge No. 1716 B’nai B’rith. In the 1980s, Sid became president of the Shalom Legion Branch #178 of the Royal Canadian Legion. Sid also became one of the founders of the Jewish War Veterans in Vancouver. Sid had a successful career conducting charitable events for the Jewish community and Vancouver’s community at large. He passed away in 1995.

Goldman, Mona

  • A.2020.002
  • Pessoa
  • 1923 - 2009

Mona Goldman (nee Silverstein) was born April 8, 1923, in Terespolya, Poland before moving to and growing up in Toronto. She began painting at an early age, being taught by a founding member of the Group of Seven, Arthur Lismer. In 1943 she attended the Chicago Institute of Design. Shortly after graduating and moving back to Toronto, she married Dr. Bill Goldman in 1947, and moved to Vancouver where they raised 3 sons, Ron, Howard, and Lorne. Mona began a successful art career, working in a nature-inspired modernist style until the turn of the century when she switched her medium to photography and digitally manipulated her images. Mona was an art teacher for UBC’s Continuing Education program for 22 years and from the 1980’s to 2002 she hosted UBC funded art tours to New York, Paris, and London.

Chertkow Family

  • A.2020.003
  • Família
  • 1955 - 1984

Gloria Gutman and Carol Gutman were born to Rachelle and David Chertkow and were two of four sisters; Patsy and Judy being the remaining two. Their mother Rachelle was a concert pianist with the Seattle Symphony Orchestra until she married David Chertkow and moved to Drumheller, Alberta, where David was a lawyer. During her childhood, Gloria lived in Seattle, Drumheller, Calgary, and lastly, she and her family moved to Vancouver in 1945.

Gloria Gutman (née Chertkow)
Gloria Gutman was very involved with the B’nai B’rith youth organization where she served as Intergroup Chairman, Sentinel, Treasurer, Vice-President and lastly, District President. Gloria graduated from Prince of Wales High School and afterwards received a BA in Psychology from UBC, an MA in the Psychology of Aging from the University of Alberta, and a Ph.D. in Developmental and Social Psychology from UBC. As quoted on SFU’s website; “Gloria Gutman, Ph.D., developed the Gerontology Research Centre and Department of Gerontology at Simon Fraser University (SFU) and was Director of both from 1982–2005. She is currently a Research Associate and Professor Emerita at SFU. Dr. Gutman is the author/editor of 23 books”. In 2012, she was awarded a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, by the Government of Canada, and in 2016, she was appointed to the Order of Canada, the country’s highest civilian honour.

Carol Herbert (née Chertkow)
Carol Herbert graduated from UBC with a Bachelor of Science in biochemistry in 1966 alongside first-year Medicine when she was 19 years old. Carol became a family practitioner which combined her passion for the sciences, arts, and humanities. After dedicating herself to family practice research and teaching at UBC and chairing the department for ten years, Carol moved to London, Ontario. At the University of Western Ontario, she was appointed Dean of Medicine & Dentistry. Here, Carol was able to find a generous donor, renaming the faculty to the “Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry”. The school expanded and under Carol’s supervision, a campus in Windsor, Ontario, was opened. This doubled student enrolment and doubled research funding and introduced an undergraduate medical sciences degree. After retiring from her position as Dean, Carol returned to Vancouver where she became a visiting professor at UBC.

Congregation Beth Israel

  • Congregation Beth Israel
  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1932-

Congregation Beth Israel was formed August 2, 1932 as a Conservative synagogue in cooperation with United Synagogue of America. It was first housed in the then existing Jewish Community Centre at 11th and Oak Street. Services were held there from 1932 to 1948. Mr. Nathan Bell was the first President of the Congregation, Mrs. Etta Koenisberg the first Sisterhood President. Rabbi Benzion Bokser was hired September 1, 1932 as the Congregation’s first Rabbi. The School was established in 1933, and the choir was formed shortly thereafter. As the Congregation grew, it required more space, especially for High Holyday series, bar mitzvahs, and weddings. A building fund was established in 1937. Land at the present site was purchased in 1944 and consecrated in 1946. The first High Holyday services were held in the present sanctuary in 1948 and the synagogue dedication was held September 11, 1949. In 1945 the cemetery grounds were purchased.

In 1965 Congregation Beth Israel’s constitution was amended to give women membership and voting rights with two women elected to the Board of Directors. The role of women’s participation was first raised in 1969, while the issue of aliyot for women began in the early 1980’s, gained momentum after Yom Kippur 1986 and settled in its present form in 1995. Today women are full participants at all services and in all roles.

Today the mission of Congregation Beth Israel, member of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, is dedicated to the strengthening of all aspects of Jewish life, including worship and Torah study, religious, educational and social activities for all ages, and the observance of life cycle events.

Further Dates of Note:
• In 1970 the Groberman Chapel was renovated and refurnished.
• In 1982 the Koch Memorial Chapel at the Beth Israel Cemetery was dedicated.
• In 1992 the Beth Israel Cemetery Refurbishment project was completed.
• In 1993 the renovation of the entire synagogue was completed.
• 2007 was the 75th anniversary.
• 2012 was the 80th anniversary.
• In 2012 a major renovation and expansion was undertaken which was completed in 2014.

For a more in-depth history on Beth Israel, please see the "Beth Israel 80th Anniversary History Presentation", written by Yale M. Chernoff December 15, 2012.

Landauer, Otto F.

  • Pessoa
  • October 3, 1903-September 19, 1980

Otto Landauer was born to Jewish parents in Munich on October 3, 1903. He was the second son of Simon Landauer and Senta Seller. There was an older son, Leopold, and a third son, Albert. An only daughter, Johanna Henrietta, was born in 1912. She was named after her paternal and maternal grandmothers, and was always called "Hansi."

Landauer moved first to Portland Oregon in 1941, before moving to Vancouver in 1945. On October 1, 1946, Landauer completed the purchase of the Leonard Frank Photos (Leonard Frank passed away February 1944). Otto continued in the business until he passed away September 19, 1980. His last photographs were taken September 12, 1980, at the Marine Institute.

Altman (family)

  • Família
  • ca. 1943-ca. 2001

Hy and Bess Altman were active in a variety of Jewish organizations in Vancouver from the 1970s to the end of the 1990s. They also raised money for Israeli institutions and won recognitions for doing so.

Congregation Har El

  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1962-

The origins of what would become Congregation Har El can be traced to the determined efforts of a number of Jewish residents of the North Shore, led by Horst Sachs z”l, during the middle of the last century. The official incorporation took place in 1962 and meetings were held in private homes. In 1974, with the influx of South African Jews into the community, space was rented in the Gloria Dei Lutheran Church on 2158 Fulton Avenue, West Vancouver and regular religious services were established in the conservative tradition, including community social events. The Congregation, at this time went by the name of Sha’ar Harim, Gateway to the mountains. In 1981 the landmark figure of 100 member families was reached and a permanent rabbi, Rabbi Imre Balla was hired who guided the Congregation until 1999. In 1984 the Congregation changed its name to Har El, Mountain of God, when it moved into its own premises, renting temporary army barracks owned by the North Shore school board, at 1735 Inglewood, West Vancouver. These were renovated and greatly improved and became home for the next 13 years. In 1993, land was purchased from the British Properties on 1305 Taylor Way, West Vancouver and plans were underway to build a permanent home. On September 7, 1997 the dedication of the new synagogue took place.

Rabbi Shmuel and Sara Birnham and their son David Shalom moved to West Vancouver and joined the Har El community in the summer of 2000. The Congregation joined the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism in 2002.

The building, which was designed by Mark Ostry of the architectural firm of Acton Johnson Ostry, won the Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia Award of Excellence and the Ron Thom Wood Design Award. The facilities include a beautiful sanctuary, community centre, fully-equipped kitchen, library, meeting rooms and social halls. Congregation Har El’s classroom wing is also home to the North Shore Hebrew School.

A major renovation took place in 2008 which greatly improved the acoustics and warm ambiance of the sanctuary and main social hall.

In the summer of 2010, Cantor Teron Cohen was engaged as the first full-time professional Cantor of the Congregation.

The North Shore Jewish Community/Congregation Har El is an egalitarian Conservative congregation combining spirituality with a deep sense of tradition. Har El is a member of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism and follows its guidelines. The North Shore Jewish Community/Congregation Har El is committed to promoting Jewish identity, worship, education, culture, and values to the surrounding community and beyond.

Jewish Community Centre of Greater Vancouver, Gallery

  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1962-

Under the leadership of the JCC’s Cultural Arts Director at the time, Dvori Balshine, a committee of the JCC was first set up in February 1982 to carry out the policies of the JCC and the Shalom Gallery. This committee was led by Sivi Krisman, and the Shalom Gallery was opened. The Shalom Gallery was under the direction and administration of the Jewish Community Centre, which continues to be the case today.

In 1984 the Board of the JCC endorsed the goals of the Shalom Gallery committee. From 1982 to 1988 the Shalom Gallery put on 6 exhibits/events a year, with exhibition openings bringing in up to 400 people. Throughout this time period, Gertrude and Sidney Zack were contacted to see if they could provide funds for the building of a new larger space at the JCC. They agreed and work began on phase II of the development plan. Jack Lutsky was the architect. In 1988, the new space was opened and the name change was officially announced at its inauguration: The Sidney and Gertrude Zack Gallery. The opening gala reception of the Sidney and Gertrude Zack Gallery was held June 29, 1988 with the exhibition titled “Metamorphosis” which was an exhibit of new works by BC artists who had exhibited at the JCC over the previous 5 years when the gallery was known as the Shalom Gallery. Over 350 people attended this event. Article and photos in the Jewish Western Bulletin, July 21, 1988: (http://www.multiculturalcanada.ca/node/688758).

Today, The Sidney and Gertrude Zack Gallery is located in the centre of the active, bustling Jewish Community Centre of Greater Vancouver on 41st near Oak. The mandate for this not-for-profit gallery is to enrich the lives of community members by exposing them to a diversity of art; to educate and develop an awareness, knowledge and appreciation of visual art; and to build a sense of community.
With a primary focus on art created by visual artists in the local Jewish community or art which emulates Jewish life and culture, the gallery also serves as a venue for national and international artists. The exhibits vary in theme and medium from classical still life to contemporary abstracts. Paintings, drawings, photography, tapestry and sculpture have graced the walls and space. Gallery programs include evenings of poetry, music and art lectures. Visual art workshops and classes are offered.

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