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Bogoch, Abraham

  • Persona
  • January 11, 1922 - August 17, 2004

Dr. Abraham (Al) Bogoch was born on January 11, 1922 in Regina and passed away on August 17, 2004. Dr. Bogoch graduated in medicine with honours from the University of Toronto in 1946. He practiced as a gasterenterologist until his retirement in 1998. Dr. Bogoch was also a Clinical Professor at the University of British Columbia, as well as an author of numerous medical articles and one of the early definitive textbooks of gastroenterology. Dr. Bogoch was a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and the American College of Physicians. He was also a member of the American Gastroenterological Association of Canada, the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology, and the Canadian Society of Clinical Investigation. Dr. Bogoch was also heavily involved in the Jewish Community. He was President of the Talmund Torah School, Principle Fundraiser of the school's building campaigns and a member of the school's board of governors. He is also a Past President of the Vancouver Chapter and Regional Chairman of the Hebrew University. He served as President and Campaign Chairman of the Vancouver Community Fund and Council. He was on the board of Camp Hatikvah, the Hebrew Assistance and Social Organization, the Vancouver Chapter of the Friends of the Hebrew University, and the Canadian Shaare Zadek Hospital Foundation and the Canadian Jewess Congress. He was also the Local Campaign Chairman for the State of Israel Bonds, as well as the Regional Director of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews. He was one of the few Canadians who received the "Amudim Award" by the Torah Umesorah Day Schools for his valuable service and support to Hebrew education.

Dr. Margaret Adele Mullinger Bogoch was born October 22, 1921 in Toronto, and passed away June 16, 2012. Dr. Bogoch graduated in medicine from the University of Toronto in 1946. She, and Dr. Abraham Bogoch moved to Vancouver in 1953. She established a pediatric gastroenterology practice. . She was heavily involved in the medical community; she was a researcher, an author of medical articles, and a teacher to University of British Columbia medical students at the Vancouver General Hospital, and the Vancouver Children's Hospital. She was also an active volunteer in secular and Jewish organizations. She married Dr. Abraham Bogoch in 1950. They had three children (Sarah, David, and Ruth) and six grandchildren (Sam, Alexa, Dan, Adam, Hillel, and Benjamin).

Snider, Irving

  • Persona
  • 1903-2002

Irving Snider, officially born Isaac Schneider, was born in London, England in 1903 to Annie and Jacob Snider. Annie was born in Warsaw, while Jacob was born in Odessa. Irving’s parents met and married in London sometime around the turn of the century. After the birth of Irving, the Snider’s stayed in England for two years. During that time period, Irving’s sister Jeanette was born. In 1905, the Snider family sailed to Vancouver.

Irving attended Strathcona School and Britannia High School. While in High School, he joined the cadets. Irving also attended cheder (after school Hebrew classes), and in 1916 he was bar mitzvahed at the old synagogue. While growing up, Irving attended the “Y” camp at Hopkins Landing.

Irving graduated from Britannia High School in 1919 at the top of his class, and he enrolled at the University of British Columbia. During his second year he became a member of the UBC Junior Hockey Team. While on vacation with his mother and sister, he visited the North Pacific College, a dental college in Portland, Oregon. Although he was only 15, he decided to enroll at the dental college in 1920. Irving’s childhood friend, Robert Franks, was also at the college, and Irving and Robert graduated together in 1924.

After graduating, Robert and Irving heard that there were no dentists in the Yukon, so they decided to try their luck. In 1925, Robert and Irving headed to the Yukon with only $200 each in their pockets. According to Irving in his autobiography, when they reached Whitehorse they only had $1 left between them. After a long journey and several stops, including Juneau, Alaska and Whitehorse, Yukon, Robert and Irving arrived in Dawson City, Yukon where they stayed until Robert left for California in 1937 and Irving left for Vancouver three years later.

During WWII Irving served for four years as a Captain with the Dental Corp. He mainly served in Vancouver, but he also spent time in Trois-Rivières, Quebec and Prince Rupert. Irving was discharged in 1945. After the war, he bought a practice in the old Medical Dental Building.

Irving met his wife Phyliss Reta Nemetz through her father Harry Nemetz who was one of his patients. Irving and Phyliss married in 1947 in Victoria at the Empress Hotel. Phyliss was born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan on April 22, 1921 to parents Harry and Ann Nemetz. Phyliss was a journalist, although she spent time in New York working in advertising. When she returned to Vancouver she continued her career in journalism as well as working for Godfrey’s Travel Agency and with her father in real estate.

Irving and Phyliss spent much of their time traveling around the world, including spending time on every continent. On many of their trips they played golf, including playing at the famous St. Andrew’s course.

Irving and Phyliss moved to Whytecliff in West Vancouver where they lived for forty years. Irving and Phyliss did not have any children, but doted on their beloved dogs. Phyliss was also known for her love of animals, and was known for feeding and befriending wild raccoons in their backyard (as seen in many of the slides).

They were known for their philanthropy, including giving a major contribution to the new Har-El building. Phyliss was also an active Hadassah member and she donated all of her real estate commissions she earned to Hadassah. In 1994, Irving and Phyliss established the Phyliss and Irving Snider Foundation, a private charitable foundation, for which Louis Brier Home and Hospital was a major beneficiary. Gifts from the Foundation have supported Hillel, Jewish Family Service Agency, the Jewish Community Foundation, The Jewish Historical Society of BC, Hadassah-Wizo, Ben Gurion University, the Technion in Israel and the Vancouver Talmud Torah school.

Phyliss passed away on July 14, 1999. The couple was married for 52 years. Bequests from Phyliss’ estate have gone to several organizations including the United Way and Children’s Hospital. Irving passed away in January 17, 2002 at the approximate age of 99.

Keenlyside, John

  • Persona

John S. Keenlyside was born and raised in Vancouver and attended UBC and graduated with a degree in economics and political science. In 1973 he founded the investment-counseling firm John S. Keenlyside & Co. which he manages with his two sons.

Keenlyside has been collecting 19th century historical papers and stamps for over thirty-five years with his primary collecting interest being the history of British Columbia with an emphasis on the colonial period (pre-1871). He has also collected documents relating to the fur trade and the Canadian Pacific Railway. Keenlyside collects manuscripts, documents, maps, books and ephemera relating to B.C.

Barer, Ralph David

  • Persona
  • July 8, 1922 - August 15, 2004

Ralph David Barer was born July 8, 1922 to parents Michael and Fanny Barer. He had one brother, Harry Barer, and one sister, Thelma Stein (nee Barer). Ralph grew up in Vancouver, attending Magee Secondary School before going on to UBC, where he received a BASc in Engineering in 1945. This was followed by varied industrial and academic experiences, including a period as an assistant professor at UBC. He completed a Masters degree in Metallurgical Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1948. Ralph married Aileen (nee Gordon) in Sarnia, Ontario in 1950, after which he spent over a year working for Cominco in Trail, B.C. He then accepted a position in Victoria to head up a new material science and engineering group for Defence Research Canada in the fall of 1952. This group focused on material failures in naval, aircraft and military equipment. He led this group for 36 years, until his retirement in 1988. Ralph enjoyed raising a large family, and was particularly proud of the achievements of each of his children in their own pursuits. Ralph and Aileen had five children: Morris, Denise, Daniel, Philip and Steven. He was able to enjoy the early years of all ten [at the time of this publication in 2004] grandchildren: Justin, Naom, Michael, Ariana, Lisa, David, Benjamin, Elliot, Amichai and Simon. Ralph was an avid hiker, and spent some of his happiest times tramping through the woods of southern Vancouver Island. Walking the woods with him was always an education, as he had extensive knowledge of all things that move and grow in the Pacific Northwest. He was a passionate supporter of many of the environmental groups struggling to protect the dwindling wilderness places in British Columbia and the rest of Canada.

When Mr. Barer arrived in Victoria in 1952, the Emanuel Congregation had a lay rabbi who led infrequent services and a Jewish community which was run by a few individuals. Due mainly to his and his wife’s desire to create a Jewish environment for their growing family of five, Ralph became actively involved in the Jewish community with special emphasis on the revival of the synagogue. This led to over 50 years of dedicated work on many different committees, serving on the board, serving as a president and editing for 12 years the synagogue’s bulletin “Koleinu” (Our Voice). The results of his work were spectacular. Professional Rabbis were hired and took care of the spiritual life of the growing congregation, funds were raised to improve and enlarge the physical structure of the synagogue, Jewish teachers grew the Hebrew school, and as a result membership grew larger.

Groberman, Marjorie

  • Persona
  • September 24, 1919 - October 30, 2011

Marjorie was born in Edmonton, Alberta in 1919 to her parents Harry and Betty (Babe) Frome. She moved with her parents and brother Alan, to Vancouver in 1937. In 1941 she married Cecil Groberman, son of Morris and Hilda Groberman. They had 2 children, Jeffrey, born in 1945 and Hildy, born in 1949. Jeffrey has 2 children: Aviva Mandelman, BA and Elan Groberman, an electric engineer. Hildy Barnett has 2 children: Joel, BA and Mira.

Marjorie became very active in Hadassah- Wizo and in 1952, originating and chairing the first bazaar and exposition open to the general public at the Seaforth Armoury. For the next 10 years she traveled across Canada teaching 12 other cities how to set up their own bazaar and exposition.

In 1964 Marjorie was invited to Israel to set up the first ever bazaar and exposition at the World Wizo conference in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.

She rose to become president of Vancouver Hadassah Wizo, then National vice president and eventually a member for 4 years of the World Wizo executive in Israel.

One of the highlights of her community work was organizing the national convention of Hadassah Wizo in Vancouver in January 10-14, 1997.

In addition to Hadassah Wizo, Marjorie opened the first Vancouver office of the Israel bonds and co-chaired its first bond drive. She was also chair person of the women’s division of Combined Jewish Appeal and served as a board member of Jewish Federation for many years (both her mother and daughter served as chairs of the Combined Jewish Appeal). Her latest community work has been with the seniors department of the Vancouver Jewish Community Centre, serving on their board of directors. Marjorie and her father, Harry Frome, were honoured at a Negev Dinner in 1966. On April 28, 2010 Marjorie received from the government of British Columbia a community achievement award. Marjorie passed away October 30, 2011.

Ames, Tracy

  • Persona

Tracy Ames provided contract services to the Jewish Family Service Agency (JFSA) to produce a video and a commemorative book for JFSA’s 50th anniversary in 1986.

Frank, Leonard

  • Persona
  • ca. 1870-1944

Leonard Frank was a well-known professional photographer in British Columbia. He was born in Germany and first moved to San Francisco, before travelling to Alberni, B.C., to work in the mining industry. He began his photography interest there. In 1916, he moved to Vancouver and began to work as a photographer. He later established Leonard Frank Photos studio.

Landauer, Otto F.

  • Persona
  • October 3, 1903-September 19, 1980

Otto Landauer was born to Jewish parents in Munich on October 3, 1903. He was the second son of Simon Landauer and Senta Seller. There was an older son, Leopold, and a third son, Albert. An only daughter, Johanna Henrietta, was born in 1912. She was named after her paternal and maternal grandmothers, and was always called "Hansi."

Landauer moved first to Portland Oregon in 1941, before moving to Vancouver in 1945. On October 1, 1946, Landauer completed the purchase of the Leonard Frank Photos (Leonard Frank passed away February 1944). Otto continued in the business until he passed away September 19, 1980. His last photographs were taken September 12, 1980, at the Marine Institute.

Ehrmann, Sarah

  • Persona
  • [ca. 1930 - ]

Shirley Gurevich was born approximately 1930 and was originally from Vancouver. Shirley married and is now known as Sarah Ehrmann and lives in Israel. She attended Habonim Camp Miriam in ca. 1949-1950. Habonim Camp Miriam began in 1948 when they purchased land on Gabriola Island. However, while the Camp was being built, Camp Miriam held it's first year at Camp Hatikvah on Crescent Beach. Camp Miriam is a vital part of the Habonim program, where its ideals are practiced by living them.

Habonim was founded in 1929 in Great Britain and over a period of years, spread to all English-speaking countries. Each country developed its own independent version of the original movement whilst sharing the core ideology of being a Jewish Socialist-Zionist cultural youth movement. Dror was founded in Poland in 1915 out of a wing of the Tze'irei Tziyon (Zion Youth) study circle. The majority of Tze'irei Tziyon had merged with a group called Hashomer in 1913 to form Hashomer Hatzair, and those who remained outside of the new group formed Dror. The group was influenced by the teachings of the Russian Narodniks. Habonim Dror (Hebrew: הַבּוֹנִים דְּרוֹר, "The Builders-Freedom") is the evolution of these two separate Jewish Labour Zionist youth movements that merged in 1982.

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